Stella Nyanzi’s relationship is a teary tale her husband is the source of problems

Most of you have been asking yourselves, is Stella Nyanzi in a relationship? Is she having a husband, after all the words she saying, how comes the husband is still quiet? Now she has finally revealed the truth about her love life and it is beyond reasonable doubt that her current life was dictated by the past, her relationship with Ousman.

When Stella Nyanzi was in UK London studying her PHD, the mother of three, Baraka the eldest daughter, and Twins Kato and Wasswa, met a man of her dreams. The man was an African originating from the Gambia. They fell in love and finally got married. They produced their first daughter Baraka and shortly after 2 years, our lovely professor proved pregnant again and it was soon proved that she was having twins. Stella Nyanzi loved her husband Ousman so much just as you would expect a lovely lady with PHD in Sexual behaviors to do. But what followed thereafter was not good.

Dr.Stella Nyanzi on return to Uganda, she came back safely and it was even Ousman who paid for the tickets back to Uganda. He kept in London promising to come very soon and join them, his wife and daughter plus the twins who were yet to be born. Little did Stella Nyanzi know that it was her last time to see Ousman, who knows she will see him once again, may be.

A few days after she had arrived in Uganda, she was shocked to receive a phone call from Ousman who told her to be brave, look for a job and look after the family. She asked him if he will be back and he told her that the only thing he is trying was seeking asylum in the UK. Stella Nyanzi was confused.

“Stella, I am never coming back to Africa, at least not until I get to process my asylum here, get settled in a council flat and start earning the dole or a decent salary” he stated coldly.

“But how will you get asylum yet you are already in the UK?” I asked naively.

Stella Nyanzi went ahead asked him why he is going not coming back, leaving her and her children alone. “‘How will I survive without you? I will die of missing you. How will I raise the children without you? How will I carry and produce the twins alone? How will I manage all this on my own?’ I asked him with tears wrecking my being.” Explained Stella Nyanzi

After a long talk on a phone, it was when Ousman finally told Stella Nyanzi the secret, something he has been keeping all this while but was forced to say it out in order to explain why he is not coming back to Africa to be with them. It was a shocking moment to Stella Nyanzi,and the pregnant mother could not know what to add on.

“‘I am going to say that I am a homosexual man who will be persecuted in my home country of The Gambia, should I go back. The immigration officials know that the Gambian president threatened to behead gay people found in his country. They will grant me asylum here’ my husband of three years at the time explained to me.” Said Dr. Stella Nyanzi.

This was the time, when one of Africa’s known dictators Yahya Jammeh the president of Gambia, Africa’s smallest country had ordered for the public execution of gays. It was this reason, Ousman was not returning to Africa, but what if he came to Uganda to be with his family? But again, would Professor Stella Nyanzi feel contented with marrying a bisexual? Hell No, this was one of her saddest moments in time.

“I nearly died from that phone call. I cried for many days on end. I was puzzled about a million things in my marriage. I wondered whether I was married to a bisexual without knowing. I wondered how to explain all this madness to my family and my children. I blamed myself for taking Ousman to the United Kingdom. I was so depressed that I had three miscarriage threats in my first and second trimesters. I survived the crisis only because of the unconditional love and support of my late father, mother and three sisters.” Said Stella Nyanzi

Her Children have never seen their father, only the eldest daughter Baraka saw him, but still young as she was she can’t recall how her father looked like. From that day onwards, Professor Stella Nyanzi has been single, a single mother whose husband seems dead inasmuch as he is living. She is responsible for her children, herself and all that she has to do as a head of a family. She has never married again, and has never produced again. Firing her from work means that the Professor whose family depends on her won’t only be threatening her well being but also her children’s. Sometimes people tend to blame the fellows not knowing the life they have passed through, but many have passed in a hell, its only their strong might and the Almighty God that they can still raise their heads in public again. Her twins will make it 8 years next week and her daughter Baraka is soon making it 11.

Below is the whole story as told by Professor Stella Nyanzi

The twins turn eight years old next week, their sister is already ten years going on eleven. My sons have never seen their father. Not because they are blind or anything like that, but because we parted ways after he impregnated me. It was a peaceful parting. He paid for the air tickets from Heathrow to Entebbe, those many years ago.

At the airport, our daughter Baraka did not want to let go of her father’s hands. She cried and clung onto his legs as if she knew intuitively that this farewell was forever; well for almost a decade. In parting, his eyes were tearing. He promised to see me in a short while. He assured me he loved me as we hugged tightly.

A few days after returning back to my family in Uganda, he revealed the truth during a painful phone call.

“Stella, I am never coming back to Africa, at least not until I get to process my asylum here, get settled in a council flat and start earning the dole or a decent salary” he stated coldly.

“But how will you get asylum yet you are already in the UK?” I asked naively.

“That’s how it is done,” he replied.

“What about me and the children?” I asked.

“What about you?” he shot back.

“How will I survive without you? I will die of missing you. How will I raise the children without you? How will I carry and produce the twins alone? How will I manage all this on my own?” I asked him with tears wrecking my being.

“You are a strong woman. You will manage,” he said mercilessly, turning those words of praise into a painful penalty sentencing me. No wonder I cringe whenever people tell me that I am a very strong person.

“Why are you getting asylum, Ousman? You hated Europe and America when I first met you. How come you now want to stay there?” I asked these questions because when I first fell in love with my husband he loathed the idea of Africans who migrate to the West and forget about their African homelands.

“Stella, you are starting to irritate me by asking me your many silly questions,” my husband said gruffily through the phone. “What will I come back to Africa for? What am I returning to?” He contrinued asking.

“What about your young family? We are here in Africa,” I responded.

“Can you compare the opportunities here in the UK to those anywhere in Africa?” He asked further.

“No, I cannot compare the two. But what about us: me – your wife, your daughter and the twins in my womb? What reason are you giving for seeking asylum?” I asked.

“I am going to say that I am a homosexual man who will be persecuted in my home country of The Gambia, should I go back. The immigration officials know that the Gambian president threatened to behead gay people found in his country. They will grant me asylum here,” my husband of three years at the time explained to me.

I nearly died from that phone call. I cried for many days on end. I was puzzled about a million things in my marriage. I wondered whether I was married to a bisexual without knowing. I wondered how to explain all this madness to my family and my children. I blamed myself for taking Ousman to the United Kingdom. I was so depressed that I had three miscarriage threats in my first and second trimesters. I survived the crisis only because of the unconditional love and support of my late father, mother and three sisters.

And then one day just before delivering the twins, I decided to arise and thrive against all odds. I killed my husband mentally and purposed to live resiliently as a widow with three young dependants. It is now eight years… Me and my three kids are still thriving!!! Each year my twins celebrate their birthday, I praise all the gods for their divine support, blessings and sustenance.’

Nasa Tushabe

Believe in yourself, just like that, others will start believing in you also